Visit!  The Tabernacle JUDAICA!

SHABBAT SERVICES  |  DIRECTIONS/MAP  |  VIEW CART  |  CONTACT US

HOME  |  ABOUT THIS MINISTRY  |  ABOUT RABBI JEREMY  |  TEACHINGS  |  PHOTO GALLERY
DAVIDIC PRAISE AND WORSHIP  |  TORAH STUDIES  |  PRAYER  |  SUPPORT OUR MINISTRY  |  GIFT SHOP

 


Sukkot, the Feast of Tabernacles
 

Radio teaching notes from Rabbi Jeremy Storch


Monday

Over the last few weeks I've been speaking to you about the biblical Jewish feasts of the Lord listed in our bibles in Lev. 23, and how they all point toward and are fulfilled in the Messiah Jesus (Yeshua in Hebrew)

We've already looked at the early spring festivals of Passover, Unleavened Bread and the Feast of Firstfruits, and how they pointed toward the crucifixion, death and resurrection of Yeshua. We also looked at the Feast of Weeks (Shavuot in Hebrew) and how it pointed toward the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the Day of Pentecost and the unity of all believers (Jew or Gentile) in the Messiah.

More recently we looked at two of the fall festivals - the Feast of Trumpets (Rosh Hashanah) and the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) and their connection with the first and second coming of the Messiah. Today, we'll begin to look at another fall festival called The Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot in Hebrew). This feast is also connected with the first and second coming of the Messiah Jesus.

In Lev. 23:34-44, God told the Israelites to dwell in "booths" for 7 days and to rejoice before Him, after bringing in their fall harvest which He had abundantly supplied. The word "booth" is pronounced "succah" in Hebrew, and from the plural "Sukkot" we get the Hebrew name for the Feast of Tabernacles.

Because the Feast of Sukkot was basically an agricultural festival, God commanded the Israelites in Lev. 23:40 "to take the fruit of beautiful trees, branches of palm trees, the boughs of leafy trees and willows of the brook...". The fruit of the beautiful trees is a sweet smelling "citrus" fruit called and Etrog in Hebrew. The branches of the trees are referred to in Hebrew as the "lulav". On the 15th day of the 7th month, which is the first day of the Feast of Tabernacles "the lulav and the etrog" were waved before the Lord in every direction, acknowledging God's omni presence throughout the heavens and the earth and to thank him, through a "wave offering", for providing an abundant harvest. This was similar to the "waving of 2 loaves of leavened bread" (Lev 23:17) during Shavuot, the Feast of Weeks, another agricultural festival celebrated in the late spring.

According to rabbinic Judaism, the lulav and the etrog have different symbolic meanings, but to us as believers in Yeshua, we understand that it points toward Israel and the nations; Jew and Gentiles, who are all one in the Messiah, just like the two loaves of bread did as they were waved before the Lord during Shavuot. Deut 16:14 adds further insight to all of this, where God commands any Gentiles living amongst the Israelites to rejoice before the Lord with them, and to celebrate the Feast of Sukkot together.

Aren't you glad that all of the feasts of the Lord are for all of God's children? And aren't you glad that Yeshua broke down the middle wall of partition and that in Him, we are all one?


Tuesday

Today I would like to continue to speak to you about the Feast of Tabernacles, called "Sukkot" in Hebrew. The word "Sukkot" is the plural for the Hebrew word "Sukkah" which means a booth, or a tabernacle. In Lev. 23:41-43, God commanded the Israelites to live in booths for seven days after gathering in the fall harvest, and to rejoice before Him.

A booth (Succah) is a temporary dwelling place (flimsily made by intention). It is a temporary shelter, or a temporary provision. When God commanded the Israelites to dwell in booths (Sukkot), He was emphasizing to them and the generations that followed that their dependence was on Him, and not on a man-made structure.

The same is true for believers in Jesus today. Our dependence should also be totally upon the Lord, not on the temporal things of this life.

The Succah also pointed toward our physical bodies which are temporary dwelling places. I Peter 2:11 says that "we are merely pilgrims and strangers passing through the earth as we journey toward the "promised land" (kingdom of heaven). Our dependence should not be upon our flesh, nor upon anything materialistic, but upon God.

Still, there was another reason why God emphasized to the Israelites that they should live in booths, namely because there would come a time when He, Himself, would dwell in one, in the person of Yeshua, Jesus of Nazareth.

John chapter 1 says, "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God and the Word became flesh and dwelt among us". According to John 7, Jesus attended the Feast of Tabernacles as it was being celebrated in Jerusalem. Much of the celebration was in thanking God for providing the necessary "rainfall" for an abundant harvest.

The celebration also included "water libations", anticipating God's promise to the Israelites of sending the Holy Spirit, spoken of by the prophets. According to John 7:37-39, in the midst of all these festivities, Yeshua (Jesus) stood up in the midst of the people on the last and greatest day of the Feast and cried out, "If anyone is thirsty, let him come unto me, and from his innermost being will flow rivers of living water!", speaking of the Ruach Ha Kodesh, the Holy Spirit that would be given to all those who believe in Him.

To add even further impact to all of this, the scriptures strongly indicate that Yeshua, God in the flesh, dwelling in a "succah", was actually born during the Feast of Tabernacles. For a copy of that teaching please contact our Temple office.
 

Wednesday

For the past few days I have been speaking to you about the Feast of Tabernacles called in Hebrew "Sukkot". Some of the basic scripture references for the Feast of Tabernacles are found in Lev. 23:34-44 and Deut. 16:11-16. Sukkot is one of the most joyful feasts of the Lord celebrated for seven days from the 15th thru the 21st of the month of Tishrei, which is the seventh month of the year according to the Hebrew calendar.

Yeshua (Jesus), Himself attended the Feast of Tabernacles according to John 7, and on the last and greatest day of the Feast He stood up in the midst of the people and cried out "if anyone is thirsty, let him come unto Me and from his innermost being will flow rivers of living water", speaking of the Holy Spirit.

The Feast of Tabernacles has different names and themes given to it. It is called in Hebrew "Chag Ha-asif", (the Feast of Ingathering) because it celebrated the "ingathering" of the fall harvest. It is called "Z'man Simchateynu", (the Season of our Rejoicing). It is called the "feast of Dedication" because it was during the Feast of Tabernacles that the Temple of Solomon was dedicated (II Chronicles 7). It is called the "Festival of Lights" ("Chag Ha Orim" in Heb.) because of the "glory" of God that filled the Temple of Solomon.

It is also called "Chag Ha Goyim" (the Feast of the Nations). This is very interesting because once again we see that the biblical Jewish feasts of the Lord are not just for the Israelites, but for all the nations. In Deut. 16:11-16, God commanded any "strangers" living amongst the Israelites to celebrate Sukkot (The Feast of Tabernacles) with them. The word for "stranger" reads in Hebrew "geyr", which can also mean a foreigner, an alien, a non-Israelite or a Gentile. From the word "geyr" we get the plural word "Goyim", which means "the nations". Not only does God want Gentile believers in Jesus to celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles with Jewish believers today, but it also has great prophetic application toward the future. Zechariah 14:16 says that after the second coming of the Messiah and the battle of Armageddon, it shall come to pass that everyone who is left of all the nations shall go up year after year to worship the King (Yeshua), the Lord of Hosts, and keep the Feast of Tabernacles.

Yeshua is going to rule and reign the whole earth from Jerusalem for 1,000 years and each and every year we will all (Jew and Gentile alike) celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles together in the presence of the King.

When the 1,000 years are over, there will be a new heaven and a new earth, a New Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband, and the "tabernacle" of God will be with us forever (Rev. 21:1-3). Aren't you glad that we are all the "bride of Messiah". And aren't you glad that God ordained not only the Feast of Tabernacles, but all of His Feasts for us to celebrate together, Jew and Gentile alike.
 

Thursday

Today I'm going to conclude the series of teachings on the biblical Jewish feasts of the Lord (Lev. 23), and how they all point toward and are fulfilled in the Messiah Jesus (Yeshua in Hebrew).

There are seven major annual festivals in all; three are celebrated in the early spring, one in the late spring, and three in the fall. As you examine the significance of each feast, you will see that they spell out God's "timeline" for the history of the world and for the salvation of all mankind. The first four festivals have already been totally completed in the first coming of the Messiah Jesus. The last three, which are the fall festivals, have partially been completed in the first coming of Yeshua, and will be totally completed in His second coming.

The early spring festivals of Passover, Unleavened Bread, and Firstfruits are celebrated in the first month of the year (Nisan, according to the Hebrew calendar). They speak of the "blood of the lamb" shed for our sins by Yeshua, who became the "bread of affliction" for us (though He was sinless and without leaven), who also rose from the dead as the "firstfuits from the ground" on the day after the Sabbath during the week of Passover. Scripture references for these three feasts are in Lev. 23:5-12.

The late spring festival is called the Feast of Weeks (Shavuot in Hebrew). It is observed 50 days after Passover and Firstfruits in the third month of the year (Sivan in Hebrew). It points toward the unity of all believers (Jew or Gentile) represented by the two loaves of "leavened bread" waved before the Lord on this day, and toward the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the Day of Pentecost, the same day the Feast of Weeks was being celebrated in Jerusalem. Scripture references for this feast are Lev. 23:15-17 and Acts 2)

The fall festivals of the Feast of trumpets (Rosh Hashanah), the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) and the Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot) are celebrated in the seventh month of the year (the Hebrew month of Tishrei).

The Feast of Trumpets points toward the second coming of the Messiah when the shofar will sound from heaven, along with a loud shout of an archangel announcing the return of Yeshua, our Heavenly Bridegroom and the rapture of the bride of Messiah.

The Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) points toward Yeshua as our Great High Priest, and the "once and for all" blood atonement that He shed for all sinners. It also speaks of a future "national day of atonement" in the land of Israel, when they look upon Yeshua and weep for Him as a firstborn son" (according to Zech. 12:10).

The Feast of Tabernacles points toward the birth of Yeshua in His first coming, but also the millennial reign of Yeshua after His second coming. After the national repentance of Israel (Zech. 12) and after the battle of Armageddon (Zech. 14), all the nations will go up year after year to worship the Lord during the Feast of Tabernacles. Other scripture references for feasts are Lev. 23:23-44, I Thes. 4:16, 17, and Zech. 14:16.

All seven of these biblical feasts of the Lord are centered around Jesus, our King, Messiah, and Great High Priest, and all of them are for all of Gods people, Jew and Gentile alike.
 

Friday

At the Tabernacle we emphasize the teaching of the biblical Jewish roots of Christianity, the unity of all believers and Spirit-filled Davidic praise and worship, which is one the praise and worship songs we do at the Tabernacle and also one of the songs from our latest C.D. call "In the Presence of the Lord". The name of the song, itself, is "Yeshua, Yeshua" (the Hebrew name of Jesus).

 

 

Back
 

 
   

   
 

HOME   |   LEADERSHIP   |   OR HA OLAM OUTREACH   |   DANCE COSTUMES   |   HEALING MINISTRY   |   MEMBER BUSINESS DIRECTORY
DAVIDIC PRAISE AND WORSHIP   |   TORAH STUDIES   |  TORAH PORTIONS  |  PRAYER  |  SUPPORT OUR MINISTRY  |  GIFT SHOP/JUDAICA

SHABBAT SERVICES  |  DIRECTIONS/MAP  |  DONATIONS  |  VIEW CART  | CONTACT US

 

"SHA-ALU SHALOM YIRUSHALAYIM"
Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:
May they prosper who love you.  Peace be within your walls.  Prosperity within your palaces.
Psalm 122:6

 

"The Tabernacle" is an outreach of Tabernacle of Praise Ministries, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.
The Tabernacle is led by Messianic Rabbi Jeremy Storch and is located in Branson, Missouri.
If you have questions or comments, please email us at: info@TheTabernacleInBranson.com